The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument in the group known as internal duct flutes—flutes with a whistle mouthpiece. A recorder can be distinguished from other duct flutes by the presence of thumb-hole for the upper hand and seven finger-holes: three for the upper hand and four for the lower.
Recorders are made in different sizes with names and compasses roughly corresponding to different vocal ranges. The sizes most commonly in use today are the descant, treble, tenor  and bass. Recorders are traditionally constructed from wood and ivory, while most recorders made in recent years are constructed from molded plastic. The recorders' internal and external proportions vary, but the bore is generally reverse conical (i.e. tapering towards the foot) to cylindrical, and all recorder fingering systems make extensive use of forked fingerings.

The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument in the group known as internal duct flutes—flutes with a whistle mouthpiece. A recorder can be distinguished from other duct flutes by the presence of thumb-hole for the upper hand and seven finger-holes: three for the upper hand and four for the lower. Recorders are made in different sizes with names and compasses roughly corresponding to different vocal ranges. The sizes most commonly in use today are the descant, treble, tenor and bass. Recorders are traditionally constructed from wood and ivory, while most recorders made in recent years are constructed from molded plastic. The recorders' internal and external proportions vary, but the bore is generally reverse conical (i.e. tapering towards the foot) to cylindrical, and all recorder fingering systems make extensive use of forked fingerings.

The Dances of the Year
  • The Dances of the Year
  • The Dances of the Year
  • The Dances of the Year
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This is a quartet for recorders (Descant, Treble, Tenor and Bass.) Each movement is representative of a season.

All the movements have dance-like attributes and are intended to represent not only the four seasons, but also four musical periods.

The first movement, Spring, is in the style of a Baroque dance movement.

The second movement, Summer, is in the style of a Classical Gavotte.

The third movement is the most overtly programmatic and is divided into four subsections according to which aspect of Autumn it is describing. (Morning mists and falling leaves; Rain and Wind; Slugs and Snails and Frogs; and, finally, Birds.

The final movement is in the style of a Gigue, but brought into the 20th/21st century. The final section of this movement, Gioioso, is a hymn of praise and has words which may be sung, or not, but should in any case inform the player of the style needed.

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